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University of Exeter

 

University of Exeter

Anthropology and Film with a proficiency in Japanese, 2013-2015

ANTHROPOLOGY, FILM, JAPANESE; archaeology, Human BIOLOGY, sociology, PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS

I accepted an offer for direct second year entry at University of Exeter to combined honours in Anthropology, Film and Japanese. 

The unique course, tailored to to fully embrace my multi-disciplinary interests and intense work ethic, considered what makes humans unique as a species, how we got to be the way we are and the ways in which with express our humanness through communication, literature and art.

I completed a wide range of modules which fed in to and linked together to co-majors and minor, including: Urban Anthropology, Migration and Identity Politics, Globalisation, Diasporic Cinemas and Childhood specifically to consider themes in creative media, investigating cross-cultural concerns present in the fabric of societal consciousness. 

I graduated in 2015, and received a Dean's Commendation.
 

 
 

The Concept of Race is Redundant
DISCUSSING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCEPTS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

There are a plethora of ways in which we as humans categorise the world around us, and we, ourselves, do not escape from this compulsion. Of those arbitrary social constructs we formulate based on systematic anthropological evidence — biological, geographical and sociological — ‘Race’ is perhaps the most prevalent, recognisable and divisive. So too is it one of the most vague and inconsistent modes. The thing is, these categorisations too often take as fact are by no means absolute truths, or accurate representations of the compartmentalisations we attempt to form in order to make sense of ourselves…

 

INEQUALITIES INHERENT WITHIN THE MIGRATION PROCESS
AND THE ROLE OF THE CITY IN SHAPING THE MIGRATION EXPERIENCE

The migratory process is one that has defined the human species in its proliferation and settlement of the furthest reaches of the globe. Likewise, our sociality and interconnectivity have become vehicles for our education, creativity and production. Throughout history, however notions of civilisation have gradually organised the human species into larger and yet increasingly more regulated and defined social arrangements. The settlement of towns and cities, and the advent of nationhood has progressively restricted and curtailed the movements of its subjects and citizens both through physical fortification and cultural rhetoric…

 

EXISTENTIALISM AND FILM NOIR
SEMIOTICS IN RIDLEY SCOTT’S FINAL CUT OF HIS 1982 FILM: BLADE RUNNER.

Blade Runner portrays Los Angeles, 2019 as the antithesis of its own ‘Off World Colonies’, advertised on blimps circling the city’s eternally rain drenched skies. It is an apparition of all that has been left behind: the collection and reuse of all the detritus, repurposed and retrofitted by a moribund denizenship. An allegory of contemporary culture. One that, infused with the mythology and aesthetic of Film Noir, provides the macrocosm by which the lexicon of characters in the film question their right to and perception of the human condition…

 

GLOBALISED HYBRID IDENTITY
DO THE GLOBAL FLOWS OF IDEAS, COMMODITIES AND TECHNOLOGIES PRODUCE HOMOGENISATION, OR DO THEY ENCOURAGE A PROLIFERATION OF SUBCULTURES AND COSMOPOLITAN IDENTITIES?

The contemporary era is a globalised one. The interconnectivity of peoples, cultures and nations abounds, with the global exchange of ideas, commodities and technologies at an unprecedented level and scope. However, growing concern amongst critics of globalisation is the attendant possibility, and supposed certainty, of its expedition of homogenisation…

 

Ceremony and Gift Exchange in Japan

Japan is a society in which a great deal of weight is placed upon the practice of gift exchange. Esoteric and complex, externals to the system may only scratch the surface in understanding the minutiae of detail and consideration that goes into the ceremonial practice: the intricate wrapping for example, or the colours and motifs used. What these mean, however, and the implications reciprocity in gift exchange has on social interaction, consumption and the power of obligation can seem a nebulous web layered with curiosity and contradiction.